Workshop course

Teenager and Grandpa Arrested for Running Ghost Weapon Shop From Hangar

A teenager and his grandfather have been arrested for leading a ghost gun operation out of their backyard shed, after police discovered a stash of AR-15 ghost rifles, including one that had been modified in machine gun.

Clayton Hobby, 18, and Kerry Schunk, 64, have been slapped with a series of gun charges over the hoard of illegal weapons the grandfather and grandson duo claimed to have built to protect their own families.

Police in East Hampton, Conn., said the pair had several AR-15 ghost rifles in various stages of assembly in their makeshift workshop, along with three polymer ghost pistols, 15 large capacity and approximately 1,000 rounds.

Also found in Mr. Hobby to ownership.

Mr Hobby, who said he thought ‘guns are cool’, sought to blame the whole operation, telling police: ‘It’s all mine. My grandfather has nothing to do with it.

The network closed in on the illegal operation when police were tipped off Monday by a local resident who said he heard an adult resident of the town was making illegal AR-15 assault rifles.

Officers identified Mr Hobby as the suspect before learning during the investigation that he was also being helped in the ghost weapon shop by his grandfather, according to East Hampton police.

In a bizarre twist, after officers received the tip, Mr Schunk walked into the local police station saying he wanted to ask about “the legality of building an AR-15”, a reported Middletown Press.

Clayton Hobby, 18, told officers he thought ‘guns are cool’

(East Hampton Police)

The grandfather told the officers he wanted to build one with his grandson.

The 64-year-old allegedly told police his grandson had received an AR-15 in the mail without a serial number, so they ‘smashed it with a hammer and threw it away’ and had no received no other weapon or weapon part. because.

When asked to give a statement, Mr Schunk reportedly quickly left the police station.

Officers followed him to his home and asked him if he had an illegal firearm, police said.

At that point Mr Schunk called his grandson out of the house who told police ‘everything’ was his.

Investigators then discovered the arsenal of weapons.

Kerry Schunk, 64, said he didn’t think his grandson had ‘bad intentions’

(East Hampton Police)

When questioned, Mr Hobby confessed to buying the guns and tools online and told officers he thought ‘guns are cool’ and that gun laws are ‘tyrannical’, said the police.

The 18-year-old, who admitted he was sometimes ‘paranoid’, insisted he had no intention of hurting anyone but just wanted to protect his family, said said the police.

Police said Mr Schunk said he did not believe his grandson had ‘bad intentions’. He also admitted that he made up the story of the downing of an AR-15.

Mr. Hobby was charged with three counts of possession of an assault weapon, three counts of criminal possession of a pistol, one count of criminal possession of ammunition, one count of manufacturing a machine gun , 15 counts of possession of large capacity magazines and a number of risk of injuries.

Mr. Schunk was charged with three counts of conspiracy to commit possession of an assault weapon, three counts of conspiracy to commit criminal possession of a pistol, one count of conspiracy to to commit criminal possession of ammunition, one count of conspiracy to commit the manufacture of a machine firearm, 15 counts of conspiracy to commit possession of large capacity magazines and one count of interference with an officer.

Part of the stash of ghost weapons and ammo found in the makeshift workshop

(East Hampton Police)

Mr. Hobby is being held on $250,000 bail while Mr. Schunk is being held on $100,000 bail.

The discovery comes a month after President Joe Biden promised to crack down on phantom guns across America amid an increase in mass shootings and gun violence.

Ghost guns are guns that are typically purchased as kits and assembled at home, taking as little as 30 minutes to assemble.

They do not have a serial number, which makes them difficult to trace and track ownership.